Gargoyles


[ezcol_1half]In architecture, a gargoyle is a carved or formed grotesque with a spout designed to convey water from a roof and away from the side of a building, thereby preventing rainwater from running down masonry walls and eroding the mortar between. Many medieval cathedrals included gargoyles and chimeras. The most famous examples are those of Notre Dame de Paris. [/ezcol_1half] [ezcol_1half_end]Although most have grotesque features, the term gargoyle has come to include all types of images. Some gargoyles were depicted as monks, or combinations of real animals and people, many of which were humorous. Unusual animal mixtures, or chimeras, did not act as rainspouts and are more properly called grotesques. They serve more as ornamentation, but are now synonymous with gargoyles.[/ezcol_1half_end]